Boris Johnson and EU chief agree to extend Brexit talks

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uk eu talks
Uk Eu talks

Boris Johnson and EU chief agree to extend Brexit talks

Boris Johnson and EU chief Ursula von der Leyen agree to extend Brexit talks beyond Sunday deadline after call.

Talks to find a post-Brexit trade deal will continue after today’s deadline, it has been confirmed.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen called on Sunday, with the pair agreeing to “go the extra mile”.

A joint statement from both read: “We had a useful phone call this morning. We discussed the major unresolved topics.

“Our negotiating teams have been working day and night over recent days.

uk eu talks
Uk Eu talks

“And despite the exhaustion after almost a year of negotiations, despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over we think it is responsible at this point to go the extra mile.

European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen said in a brief statement that she and Boris Johnson had mandated negotiators to continue talks.

“I had a constructive and useful phone call with Prime Minister Boris Johnson,” she told reporters.

“We discussed the major unsolved topics. Our negotiation teams have been working day and night over the recent days.
“And despite the exhaustion, after almost one year of negotiations, and despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over, we both think that it is responsible at this point in time to go the extra mile.
“We have accordingly mandated our negotiators to continue the talks and to see whether an agreement can be reached, even at this late stage.”
She added: “The negotiations continue here in Brussels.”

Brexit talks delays ‘cost businesses a lots of money’

The CBI, the UK’s business lobby group, says that news the UK and the EU will continue Brexit talks gives it hope.

But it says: “Ongoing delays are frustrating and cost businesses.”

The CBI says the UK government must, firstly, provide detailed guidance to businesses this week on issues such border checks.

Secondly, companies must be given a grace period to allow them to adjust to a deal or no deal.

“And third, prepare support for firms who will face the greatest challenges in the short run. Those in sectors and supply chains that are badly hit will face extinction through tariffs, red tape and extra costs.”

The fact that talks are ongoing is a good thing. Business groups are unanimous in their view that if a deal is at all possible, it should be pursued with every last effort.